“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” – Mark Twain


Leave a comment

The Three Passages: Part 2 – Luperon to Samana in the Dominican Republic

Continuing on our sail along the Thorny Path to the Caribbean Islands we went from Luperon to Samana in the Dominican Republic. For this passage we were traveling along the north east coast of the Dominican Republic. We were traveling in a general southeast direction which means we are going head on into the trades and equatorial currents.  That makes sailing difficult or near impossible at times. So we prepared for what we expected to be a motorsailing passage of around 130 nautical miles.

We also were hoping for a weather window that would allow us to just keep going right to Puerto Rico. This is not unheard of and often cruisers will get lucky and be able to keep going rather than turn into Samana Bay. That would make a motorsailing passage of 250 nautical miles. Being the small boat in the group this posed a small problem. A passage of 250 nautical miles at an average of 5 knots is a 50 hour passage.  We burn between 0.5 to 0.9 gallons an hour depending on how hard we push the motor; typically its around 0.6 gallons an hour at a comfortable cruising speed. That would mean we would use between 25 and 45 gallons of diesel for this passage (30 gallons based on our average). Our boat holds 26 gallons in her fuel tank.  We typically have one 5-gallon gerry can on deck of additional diesel. But you typically don’t want your tank to drop below 1/4 full because then you can suck up sediment, debris or biological growth from the tank and clog your fuel filters. So that meant we wanted to have 40-50 gallons of diesel on board to do this passage.  The larger boats we have been traveling with have much larger fuel tanks and a passage of this length is within their fuel tanks capacity. So to prepare for this passage we drained the gasoline from our two 5-gallon gerry cans we typically use for reserve fuel for the dinghy and the Honda generator. We let those sit open for a few days to volatilize off most of the residual gasoline. We also borrowed another 5-gallon can from Sea Frog.  We had Handy Andy fill up our tank and all the gerry cans. That gave us around 46 gallons of diesel (I say around because you can actually fit about 5.8 gallons in our two tall cans). So if the motor sailing went well, we would have plenty of fuel. If we had to fight high seas and strong currents we might be pulling in Puerto Rico on fumes. But we are a sailboat after all so it’s not like we would be without a means of propulsion. We would just have to watch our fuel usage and maybe sail some sections if we got too low on fuel.

This passage is made more difficult than it needs to be by the bureaucracy of the Dominican Republic. In most countries you check into the country once, typically purchase a cruising permit, and then are allowed to sail from harbor to harbor during your stay.  Sometimes you need to check out of the country before leaving. With the Dominican Republic you need to check out before leaving each harbor and then check into the next harbor. Often there is a fee for each check out and check in. The legitimacy of these fees is another matter and not to mention the “gifts” often requested.

To make matters more complicated you can only check out and in during certain hours. For instance, if you were to try and follow Passages South: The Thornless Path to Windward Bruce Van Sant recommends you leave Luperon in the evening, around 10 PM. This lets you take advantage of the night lees that come about from the land breeze over powering the reduced trades that are often seen at night. The advantage of this is that you can sail relatively close to the coast with reduced seas and winds that will either help you on your journey or be a non-factor. However the Luperon Commandant will only allow check outs up to 6 PM.  You must clear the harbor by around 6 PM and radio in to him to confirm that you have left. Cruisers that have attempted to check out during the afternoon but not leave until 9-10 PM have reported being chased down by the local port authorities and made to turn around.

Another part of the bureaucracy is that if you request your Despacho, the name for the paper they give you when you check out, and give the Commandant a destination of Puerto Rico but then decide to stop due to weather, mechanical problems, or what ever, you will need to pay all of the check in fees again. But if you give the Commandant a destination of another port in the Dominican Republic and you stop at any port between where you requested the Despacho and the destination you gave the Commandant then you only have to pay the local port fees.  But what happens if you continue on to the Puerto Rico if you have a good weather window? Well as it turns out, the US Customs authorities don’t care about the Despacho. So the only risk you have is that if you return the Dominican Republic they may catch you for not checking out appropriately. But while there are computer records of the processing paperwork, it appears unlikely that there is a centralized system to comparing these records. So it seemed like a minor risk to us.  We even discussed this with the Commandant and he recommended we get our Despacho for Samana or a port further southeast.

So considering all these factors, Sea Frog, Party of Five and Smitty decided to get our Despacho from Luperon with a destination of Samana. After hearing of our plans two other vessels, Sea Squirrel and Last Tango, decided to head out as well. This meant heading out into the highest winds and seas of the day and hoping we could make some good progress until the night lees kicked in.

We cleared the harbor, radioed the Commandant and headed out into the Atlantic to begin our passage.  As soon as we headed east out of the protection of the harbor we were met with 20-25 knot winds and 4 to 6 foot seas on the nose. The wind was so dead on the nose that raising the mainsail would do nothing but flog.  This meant slow going.  Smitty can typically maintain around 3.5 to 4.5 knots in these conditions.  Sea Frog has the hardest time maintaining speed under these conditions and was making around 2.5 to 3.5 knots. So Smitty and Party of Five backed down our throttles to keep our group together. Sea Squirrel continued on at around 4.5 to 5.5 knots and Last Tango actually departed Luperon about 30 minutes behind the rest and were keeping a decent pace with the overall group.

As night approached we were all in radio range with most boats in visual contact with each other. We eagerly anticipated the onset of the night lee. It never really came. As we approach Puerto Plata around 10-11 PM the winds and seas were still much higher than we anticipated and progress was slow. Following recommendations from Bruce Van Sant, we tried going closer to shore. The theory is that since the trades were higher than expected we would need to get closer to shore to see the night lee affect. Bruce recommends sailing in 80 to 120 foot deep water to best see the night lee while avoiding the flotsam that accumulates a little further offshore. We found that if we got much closer we could see some improvements in the conditions. This meant operating at night in 40 feet of water. For us this is a little shallow for comfort when operating at night in unfamiliar waters.  We prefer our night passages to be in hundreds, if not thousands, of feet of water. But the conditions were better so we continued on closer to shore.

We were making slightly better speed, around 4 knots.  We were monitoring the other boats in our armada and unknown boats by radar. Sea Frog, Party of Five, Sea Squirrel and Last Tango also have AIS. The chart plotters were watch diligently as we were close to areas with reefs and rocks that could force us further from shore to avoid running aground. Everything was beginning to proceed as planned with this passage until Party of Five almost hit a fishing boat. This is not the US and many of the small fishing boats don’t follow lighting regulations. These small fishing boats are also too small to give a radar signal in these conditions. If it were flat calm we might have been able to see them on radar but not in 3 to 5 foot seas. They just blend in with the nose of the waves and spray. So while we were all using the technology available to us, we still had one of the boats in our group come within 20 feet of another vessel that they didn’t know was there until they were passing it. Scary stuff!  Enough so that Smitty went back to the 100 foot deep waters to reduce the chances of a similar incident or worse.

We continued to proceed down the coast of the Dominican Republic.  By around 1AM it became clear to all of us that the window we thought we had for crossing all the way to Puerto Rico wasn’t there.  The forecasts were slightly off and the conditions were making our passage too slow to reliably go for the full trip. So we set our sights on Samana. Around 4 AM we started looking at our progress and it appeared we would round Cabo Frances around 6-7 AM and that we would be traveling towards Cabo Samana when the mid day to afternoon trades would be starting to kick up.  In Bruce Van Sant’s words this was suicide.

Instead of trying to continue on to Samana, we decided to anchor at Rio San Juan to wait for the next night’s lee to round Cabo Frances and Cabo Samana. The anchorage at Rio San Juan was behind a reef that was poorly charted. So we slowed our speed to ensure we would enter the cut in the reef after sunrise so we could see the reef if possible. Smitty lead the way to scope out the anchorage for the deeper draft vessels. Normally we leave this duty to Party of Five because they are a catamaran with the shallowest draft of all of us but we decided to give them a break on this anchorage. We used Bruce Van Sant’s waypoints and descriptions to enter the anchorage. While we couldn’t see the actual reef, there were some indications of its locations on the surface of the water. We made our way in and set the hook in 15 feet.  Securely anchored it was time for a nap.

Around 2 PM my nap was disturbed by the local Commandant. Lacking any boats of his own at this port, he used a local fisherman to bring him out to talk to the boats anchored in his harbor. He checked our paperwork and was very courteous and professional. When he was done, he did ask for a gift for the fisherman. The navy does not provide the Commandant with a boat but they expect him to perform this duty. They also don’t give him a stipend to pay the local fisherman to give him a lift out to the boats anchored in his harbor. So the fisherman give him rides out of their sense of obligation to their country. So a small gift for these fisherman is not out of line. We gave them some cans of cold Coke and some cookies.

That afternoon we had a weather discussion based on VHF radio. Our access to weather data was significantly reduced since there were no open wifi networks within range of Party of Five’s wifi antenna.  We used sources like SSB transmissions, InReach weather texts and texts from other cruisers over the InReach to get the weather. Based on what we were getting for weather reports it looked like it would be similar to the previous night. We decided we would head out just after sunset before we lost light to work our way out of the cut. 

One good difference for the second night’s passage was that the wind would be slightly off the bow making motor sailing more of an option. So once we cleared the reef, we hoisted the mainsail with the first reef in. We rounded the lee of Cabo Frances and the conditions were similar to the previous evening. We continue on, staying relatively close to land in the 80-120 feet of water area.  Once we fully rounded the cape and started heading south, the conditions improved greatly.  It was still more wind and seas then the forecast said but it was much more comfortable. We were able to let the autopilot steer and just make up some time and distance. 

For much of the passage from Cabo Frances to Cabo Samana, Smitty lead the pack. We had taken a more favorable angle that let us motorsail at around 6 to 6.5 knots while the engine was only running at 1,700 RPMs (below our cruising range of 2,200 to 2,600 RPMs).  As we approached dawn, Sea Squirrel passed us and kept going around the Cabo Samana.  We further backed off our throttle to keep the rest of the group close and within sight. We even deployed a fishing line, not that we had any bites.

We were docked at a first class resort marina by noon.  Passage two of three over with and it was time to soak in one of the infinity pools and look for our weather window for crossing the Mona Passage.

cover


2 Comments

Dominican Republic

DR1

As the sun was rising, we began to see the breathtaking views of the Dominican Republic (DR or DomRep).  Our first stop was Luperon.  The bay here is stunning – picture the mountains of New England with a line of mangroves at the foothills that roll right into the water.  Everything here is so lush and green.  The bay is an ideal hurricane hole for boats of all sizes and the food and beverages are shockingly cheap.  I can see why so many people end up moving here permanently.  If it wasn’t for the poor water-quality (definitely no swimming!), we would have spent much longer here.

DR2

Luperon – Puerto Plata

I cannot say that it is easy to check in at this port of call.  First of all, my Spanish es no bueno, or shall I say my Spanglish, so dealing with several different officials (whom speak/understand very little or no english) was a bit of a challenge. 

Step one:  The Marina Guerra (Coast Guard) will board your boat as soon as you are anchored or moored. No $ is required to give to them but be ready with copies of passports, vessel documentation, departure form from last port of call, and ice cold beers (yes, they absolutely will ask for beer!)

Step two:  The Captain goes to shore with all of the same documents and tries to figure out which of the three rooms in a very hot, not air-conditioned trailer to go to first and what fees are actually due.  The fees that are required to be paid are not clearly documented, so when you go to check-in by boat be sure to bring lots of pesos or USD.  The cost for our 31-foot vessel with two adults and one dog was as follows (amounts in USD):    Cruising Permit/Other Fee $60,  Tourist Card- $10 per person,  Harbor Charge $25 (for a 10-day stay)

Step Three: When you are ready to leave, you play a similar game in order to get your despacho (exit permit).  However, no fees are required to leave.

DR3

We decided to make a day-trip to Damajaqua Cascades (27 waterfalls) with the crews of sv Sea Frog and sv Party of Five.  So, trying to figure out how to get nine people there was a bit of a challenge.  Travel choices in the DR are as follows:  car rental, guagua*, donkey/horse, or motoconchos**.

*Guagua is a small car or van that is overstuffed with people (you will literally see people overflowing from the vehicle), far exceeding their recommended (safe) capacity.

**Motoconcho is a motorbike that is used for public transportation.  You will see as many as four adults + children on one bike.  You will also see furniture and other large items being moved on these bikes.

DR TRAVEL

As we had a former local resident in our mix (thank you Darren!), he hooked us up with a rental….which turned out to be someone’s personal SUV (not the van that we were expecting)…thank god we were traveling with three skinny kids!

DR WATERALLS

We spent another day touring Puerto Plata.  We took in the sites,  made & smoked cigars at the Cigar Factory, drank rum on the Brugal Rum Factory tour, ate chocolate on the tour at the Del Oro Chocolate Factory, and of course had beers on the beach.

DR PUERTO PLATA

DR RUM

DR FORT

DR CIGARS

After leaving Luperon, we stayed a couple nights in Samana in order to wait out weather before making our way across the Mona Passage to Puerto Rico.

SAMANA

DSC SUNSET


4 Comments

The Three Passages: Part 1 – Turks & Caicos to the Dominican Republic

When you sail the Thorny Path to the Caribbean Islands there are three passages that really give this trip it’s name.  Turks & Caicos to the Dominican Republic, the north east coast of the Dominican Republic from Luperon to Samana and the Mona Passage from the Dominican Republic to Puerto Rico. These passages are the toughest to sail because you are trying to cover large distances into the trade winds, against the equatorial currents and with relatively large seas stealing your forward momentum.

Like most cruisers that travel this path we often consult Passages South: The Thornless Path to Windward by Bruce Van Sant.  Bruce is a sailor who has done this trip many times and now lives in the Dominican Republic. He does share some great information but as with all things cruising, everything depends on the weather.

After spending some time in Providenciales, we moved on to Cockburn Harbor in South Caicos to stage for the crossing and await our weather window.  As we mentioned in our post on Turks and Caicos, we were now traveling with some new friends on s/v Sea Frog and s/v Party of Five. We were also joined by our friend Fabio on s/v Odoya and s/v Sea Squirrel.  Sea Squirrel was buddy boating with s/v Notre Voyage who chose to stage in a slightly more south location.  Sea Squirrel and Notre Voyage were looking to make the crossing on the next weather window as well.

The passage is about 110 nautical miles which should take approximately 22 hours traveling at an average of 5 knots.  Waiting on weather is one of the things that cruising boats just have to get used to.  You want to see a clear window for at least twice as long as you need.  Ideally you want a window three times what you need.  In this case that would be three days.  The first day to let the seas calm down some, the second day to make the passage and the last day as a contingency incase something goes wrong or the window starts to collapse on you.  In the US and even the Bahamas, checking weather was relatively easy. You use your phone for cellular data or a wifi network somewhere to get online and check weather. The sources we like to use are Wind Finder, Windyty, Passage Weather, NOAA offshore weather, Weather.com and Weather Underground. In Cockburn Harbor there were no real open WiFi networks and none of us had a cell phone that worked in Turks and Caicos. We did find a store that had WiFi in the store and we could get some internet while we were in the store.

There is also the weather guru: Chris Parker. Chris provides a paid weather routing service with several levels of subscription. He also does a broadcast every morning except Sundays on single side band radio (SSB).  SSB is like HAM radio but on boats, its capable of broadcasting over long distances but requires specialized equipment. SSB radios can run as high as $3,000 for a complete system capable of receiving and sending transmissions. Our budget and space didn’t allow for a full system.  Instead we opted for an SSB receiver only.  It allows us to listen to Chris Parker in the morning and a few other weather broadcasts throughout the day. Sea Frog has a complete SSB system and a subscription to Chris Parker that allows her to ask specific routing questions over the SSB and she gets email updates a few times a day.

Herein lies our dilemma. The day we got into South Caicos was probably the best day to make the crossing. We should have just turned right after crossing the Caicos bank and just kept going to the Dominican Republic.  But we hadn’t checked out with Customs from Turks and Caicos. So that wasn’t an option. So we dropped the hook in South Caicos and began the process to clear out. It took over 3 hours just to get the Customs officer to come and see us and then less than 10 minutes per boat to get cleared out.  You had to fill out a form and pay a fee.  Really it was all about the fee.  But we were good to go and could leave on the next weather window.

Unfortunately our window wasn’t there.  We had missed the good window.  After waiting another day after clearing out, we decided to go for it on a less then ideal. The forecast was for 15-25 knots of wind, more or less on the nose or just off, and seas 4-6 feet with a shorter period. We decided to head out of the harbor at noon and if the conditions were too bad we could always head back to harbor and wait for the next window which was more than a week away. Fabio was under the weather and didn’t join us for this passage.

Notre Voyage and Sea Squirrel also decided to go on this window. Notre Voyage is an older Gemini catamaran and many people question this boat for offshore work. One of the flaws that people point out on this boat is the solid bridge deck between the bows instead of trampolines. This arrangement doesn’t allow the hulls to move as much as needed in heavy seas and can result in a lot of water being taken over the deck. About 5 hours into the passage Notre Voyage put out essentially a mayday call.  One of their hulls was half full of water and they didn’t know why. At first Sea Frog, Party of Five and Smitty slowed down. After a new more radio communications Notre Voyage thought they may have to abandon ship.  Our three boats turned around and started heading back to them as fast as we could travel. We were about 4-6 miles from them at this point.

We were in some kind of rough conditions.  Winds were 18 knots with gusts up to 35 knots when we got near some squalls.  Seas were very confused.  We had 6-8 foot ocean swell on the port bow and 4-6 foot wind driven waves on the port stern. Sometimes they would meet and combine and you would end up with 8 to 12 foot waves breaking on your boat.  We got pooped several times where the wave came right over the side of the boat and into the cockpit.  We had the hatch boards in and the waves would just sweep right out the open stern.  So no big deal for us.

We reached Notre Voyage and circled around their boat for an hour or two while they figured out what was going on.  They don’t have a manual bilge pump on the boat and were waiting for the small electric bilge pump to get the water out.  The rest of us advised them to use buckets to help drain the hull as quick as possible.  After getting the hull partially drained they found the problem and had the hull mostly drain. The Gemini has sail lockers in the bow of each hull.  The drain for the sail locker had gotten plugged with trash or debris and the locker was overflowing into the bilge of the hull.  So much water was coming over the bows of the Gemini that it filled the sail lockers with water that then drained into the hull and over whelmed the bilge pump so the hull filled with water.  But at first they didn’t know where it was coming from.  They thought the hull had separated from the pounding and they were going to have to abandon ship. 

Later we found out they were much closer to loosing the boat then any of us knew. A similar Gemini has the same issue last year and when one of the hulls go too full of water it flipped.  Thankfully that didn’t happen here.

With the situation under control we started back towards Luperon.  We had lost about 3 hours. Plus now we didn’t have the light to cross this shallow bank and get a better angle on the wind. So now we were motorsailing almost dead into the wind and waves.

About 2AM we started hitting squalls.  We could see them forming on radar.  We tried to avoid them and did for the most part but the cells that were forming were also joining together and making really large squalls.  At one point we were about a half mile from Party of Five when a lightening bolt hit in between us.

We ended up making it into Luperon around 2PM.  The passage had taken just over 26 hours. We had motor sailed the whole trip and averaged over 5 knots when you remove the time we were helping Notre Voyage and avoiding squalls.

DR peso


Leave a comment

Cost to Cruise – May 2016

May marks the month we finally left the Bahamas;  so our costs for this month includes entry fees for Turks & Caicos and Dominican Republic.  We also got a bit overzealous when we went to a ‘real’ grocery store – we definitely bought some pricey items and treated ourselves.

May 2016  TOTAL $ 2,413.27

$  245.00     CUSTOMS – ENTRY FEES

$  340.80     MARINA

$  861.55     GROCERIES

$  491.24     ENTERTAINMENT (eating out, alcohol, and excursions)

$    42.00     BOAT PARTS & OTHER

$  219.68     FUEL (Diesel & Gasoline)

$  170.00     COMMUNICATION

$    30.00     LAUNDRY

$    13.00     PROPANE

         Summary of previous months’ Totals*:

April 2016         $ 1,956.78

March 2016      $ 3,149.20

February 2016  $ 1,851.99

*previous month’s are detailed in prior posts

DSC_5098


5 Comments

Turks & Caicos

 

DSC_5098

Turtle Rock

DSC_5094

Water color changes:  darker blue (close) is the deep water; the beautiful turquoise is the more shallow water

DSC_5096

After a 36-hour passage from Long Island, Bahamas, we arrived in Providenciales (Provo) in the country Turks & Caicos.  Our plan was to have a 7-day or less stopover here in order to provision, take on water and fuel and wait for a weather window to head to the Dominican Republic.  Staying any later then 7-days in this country would mean that we would have to pay an additional hefty fee – No Thanks! 

This island was full of resorts and a fee is required by each resort in order to enter and go to their beaches and restaurants.  All of the nice beaches are privately owned (residences or resorts) and nothing is within walking distance.  The marina owner was nice enough to drive the cruisers to the grocery store each day; other than that, we did not spend any time outside of the marina.

DSC_5101

Several boats that are headed to the Caribbean had come into this marina in Provo within a day or so of each other.  We quickly made friends with Kendra (Owner/Captain) & Darren (Crew) on sv Sea Frog; you can follow her travels on Where is Kendra – My Adventures on Sea Frog. And, thanks to Barbara Hart on sv La Luna (published author and blogger – check out Harts at Sea)  for the introductions, we met up with Rhonda & Travis and their three kids (Quincy, Jonah, Daphnie) on sv Party of Five. This family is on a plan to sail the world! You can follow them at Party of Five.

Turks & Caicos-001

sv Sea Frog                                                                        sv Party of Five

DSC_5127

Left to Right adults:  Darren, Kendra, Rhonda, Travis, Fabio (sv Odoya), Stacey                                                                                                                                      Kids of sv Party of Five:  Jonah, Quincy, and Daphnie

DSC_5128

In order to stage to jump to Luperon, Dominican Republic, we headed to South Caicos.  We anchored in Cockburn Harbor.  We were surprised that this sleepy little town was having a huge party – their Annual Regatta.  This regatta included sail and power boat races, junkanoo, face painting, games, bands, food & beverages.  A few of the more daring guys in our group ate turtle and did not feel so well later that night!

Collages

Turks & Caicos

DSC_5143

Great name for a boat:  RUM DRINKER 1

DSC_5268

Junkanoo performers

Finally, we paid an extra fee to the government official in order to check-out over the weekend, and we were off to Luperon the next day.


11 Comments

Boat Thoughts 10 Months Into Cruising

A blog follower recently asked us to give some updated thoughts on our boat and outfitting choices.  We have also been asked similar things by friends on Facebook and others who are thinking about sailing on a smaller than average boat.

In ten months of full time cruising we have put over 3,000 nautical miles under our keel.  For full time cruisers this puts us on the lower end but we have been enjoying ourselves on this slow pace that has allowed us to enjoy places like the Bahamas much more than other cruisers who pass through these places in a month or two. 

Our confidence in our boat and our abilities has grown exponentially in these ten months. We have been through good and bad and come out the other side more competent sailors who know where to push our boat and where not too.  Recently we left South Caicos for a 110 mile passage to Luperon, Dominican Republic in conditions that typically would have kept us at the dock back in Hingham. The experience has been more than I can put into words and we have no thoughts on turning back.  We just need to figure out how to make some money to keep it going.

Also, I firmly sit in the camp of it’s the sailor, not the boat.  Almost any boat out there is capable of putting up with more seas and winds then her crew.

The Boat: Size, Make, etc.

“It’s a production boat with a fin keel and spade rudder, you’re going to die if you take that off shore!”

“Your boat is too small and will go too slow for any buddy boating.”

“You won’t be able to carry enough provisions.”

These are some of the things we heard from internet forums, Facebook groups, and drunken sailors at bars and beaches during sundowners. The reality is that the majority of boats we see out cruising are production boats: Catalinas, Hunters, Jenneaus, Beneteaus, etc. In terms of numbers we see more Beneteaus than anything, with Catalinas coming in second and Hunters and Jenneaus about the same in number. The further south we go it seems like the more we see. 

It funny, the people in these lower end production boats seem to have gone further and cruised longer than many of the people in expensive semi-custom boats.  Every time we run into someone in a nice Cabo Rico or Caliber their idea of cruising is going from Florida to George Town, Bahamas and back every year. But that’s what makes this lifestyle great; everyone can do it their own way on their own boat.

The bottom line for us on boat make is you sail what you like.  If the interior layout and function of a Beneteau is what speaks to you then go with it.  If you like the feel of a big full keel boat under sail then that is the boat for you.  But don’t be dogmatic about it.  Don’t try to force your opinion on other sailors. Most of all, don’t suffer from confirmation bias by only listening to those who think and act the same as you.

I spent a lot of time reading and researching boat design, construction techniques, construction materials and hull shapes to come to my opinions.  I understand the advantages and disadvantages of a modern broad beam hull versus a traditional, narrow beam heavy displacement hull.  I also understand the differences in how you handle these boats under sail and how you weather a storm in them. You can’t substitute this research and you can’t outsource it.  If you plan to make a life at sea you need to put in the time. 

The age we live in is the best time in human history to do this research.  Take Robert Perry for instance.  He is one of the most prolific boat designers of any age of pleasure yacht building.  He has brought us beauties like the Valiant 40, Tayana 37, several Pacific Seacrafts and many others.  He writes books, he blogs and he posts on Facebook about his newest design, the carbon fiber cutter project. The access to information is so great.  Yet I will often hear or read people bragging about a feature on their boat as a safety design while a quick search will have you read in Bob’s own words that it was for marketing and ascetics. But people like to repeat their “old salt” opinion even when it has no basis in fact.  There are stickers in the local bar here in Luperon that read “barstool sailor”.  That best describes many of these opinions to me.  They like to brag about their knowledge or experience when most of it has little basis in fact.

On the size, this one is a little more complicated.  We have been on boats from 22 feet to 60 feet and they all have a different feel.  While we love cruising our Catalina 310, we could never fathom cruising a Catalina 320 despite it have over a foot of waterline on us.  The layout, the feel, even things like the displacement to sail area or the length to beam are completely different even though they came out of the same factory at the same time.  One example of this is that on many of the Catalina 320 wing keels the rudder extends to the bottom of the keel or just below.  With the Catalina 310 the rudder is about six inches shorter than the keel.  I consider this an important safety feature.  If/when you run aground its the keel that takes the blow not the rudder.  But I digress since this has more to do with design then size. My point being that it is very difficult to compare sizes of different makes and manufacturers.

We have never once felt that our boat was too small for the sea conditions.  We have been pooped several times now and find that our open transom is great. The water drains right out and I can never get more than ankle deep water in the cockpit.  We have friends on traditional “blue water” boats with small cockpits that fill up when pooped and they are often standing, or even sitting, in water.

Catalinas do have large cockpits.  We love this at anchor, which is where you spend most of your time.  In heavy seas this is seen as a liability.  We have owned our boat for over 5 years now and know how to move around the cockpit in seas.  I suspect this is the same for every boat, including catamarans.  At the end of passages its not uncommon to compare “boat bites”; those injuries you get from being tossed around in seas or slipping while trying to handle the boat.

The same can be said for the open layout of the salon.  It lakes handholds, places to brace yourself, etc. While this is true to some extent, it can be mitigated. We added a set of drawers for provisions with a table top.  This also expanded our hand holds.  We could even do more to improve on hand holds around the cabin.

Comfort motion is something we also heard would be unbearable in a production boat.  The reality is that when you have a short period and significant height waves combined, it’s not going to be comfortable.  You are going to limit your time below deck and stay immobile in the cockpit as much as possible.  And this holds for all boat types. There will be times that the seas will be uncomfortable.  You mitigate this by picking your weather window as best you can and preparing by having things like drinks and snacks in the cockpit before you set out.

Bottom line is we have discussed if want to get a bigger or different boat several times.  We have looked and can’t seem to find anything else we like better for the cost to purchase, outfit and maintain.  We are very satisfied with Catalina 310 as our cruising/living platform and don’t think we will be changing anytime soon.

Provisioning

For our size we can hold several months of food without trying too hard. We can probably hold less than say a Bristol Channel Cutter 22 despite having several feet of waterline on that boat.  This does come with some sacrifices. Many of the cruisers we met in the Bahamas left the US with 20, 30 even 50 cases of beer on board.  We only had 3 cases of beer.  That meant we bought more beer in the Bahamas where the average price for a case of local beer was $45 a case.  A case of Guinness would cost you $75. You couldn’t even find a good IPA or other craft beer. 

We also ate a lot of canned chicken and pork in the Bahamas.  Our freezer isn’t that big and carrying lots of frozen meat is not possible.  Buying chicken breast (boneless, skinless) in the Bahamas can cost as much as $30 a pound.  You can get a whole chicken at a good cost in some areas but we can’t fit that in our freezer.

If you look at our costs to cruise we spent more on food then a lot of other cruisers we know.  A big part of that is because our boat was smaller so we started with less to begin with when we left the US.  Another big part of it is we provisioned wrong.  We didn’t carry any flour when we left the states.  We hadn’t been eating much bread when we left and thought things like flour tortillas would be easy to find and inexpensive in the Bahamas.  They weren’t.  When you did find them they cost around $5 for 8 tortillas.  So we purchased some flour and started to make our own.  We also make our own bread and rolls too. 

Of course, the easiest way to offset this is to get your protein for free. We hit a good stride in Lee Stocking Island where we could get a protein for a meal pretty much at will.  Mostly that was conch but some snapper and grouper could be had as well.  And fishing offshore is the best.  Even a small mahi-mahi will give you four meals.

In the Bahamas we were price aware but still bought things at a much higher cost then we did in the states.  Our thoughts were we could buy a lot of food for the cost of getting a bigger boat.  We definitely could have been better and have now started to make a bigger effort and are being more frugal with provisioning.  But this is budget driven not space driven.  We could easily hold 6 months of supplies on our boat if we were so inclined.  Cruising the islands it’s very rare that you will go more than a week without being in a harbor with at least a small store to get some provisions.

Our friends on Wright Away have a small Engel fridge/freezer.  It’s not a large system but would triple or better our freezer space.  It will use more energy but ultimately allow us to store more fish and conch or bulk buy meat when we find good deals.  So it would likely pay for itself in a short period of time. We are considering something like this for an upgrade in the near future.

Water

The Catalina 310 holds 35 gallons in the tank under the forward berth and 20 gallons in the water heater.  I know, such a large amount in the water heater, why? As near as I can tell it was in response to cruising couples that said they both wanted to be able to shower and have hot water left to do dishes.  This works and we will typically have hot water for 3-4 days after a few hours of motoring.  However, you can’t get the 20 gallons out of the water heater without water in the primary tank.  So this means that the usable volume of water is only 35 gallons.

In addition to the water in the tank and the water heater, we carry two 5 gallon gerry cans on deck for water.  We also have a 5 gallon solar shower that we will often fill and keep as more water supply. 

One thing we should have done was add some additional tankage.  We are in the process of looking into this upgrade and will hopefully accomplish it in Puerto Rico.  The options are to 1) add a bladder or hard tank under the forward berth, 2) get rid of the 20 gallon water heater and install a smaller water heater and an additional tank, 3) find a way to plumb the water heater to allow access to that water without water in the primary tank or 4) some combination of these choices.  We are working this out and will hopefully be making this improvement soon. 

On the subject of water, our small TDS meter is invaluable.  Its a pen like device that lets you read total dissolved solids.  We use it to test any water before we put in our tank.  Around 350 PPM is considered decent drinking water.  We have seen supposed RO (reverse osmosis) water test as high as 1,000 PPM.  That is brackish water and not safe to drink despite what the marina or yacht club tries to tell you. It means their RO system isn’t working right.

Watermaker Debate

We debated long and hard about adding a watermaker.  We could buy a commercially available 12 volt system for $4-6K, a 110 volt system for $3-5K plus the cost of a Honda generator or build our own 12 volt system for around $3K. We couldn’t justify the cost of these units based on the cost of buying water.  You just can’t.  You can buy a lot of water at even $1/gallon before you come close to the cost of a watermaker.

The issue we kept having was unoperational or poor performing watermakers at several of the key ports where we wanted to take on water.  In addition, we had to leave some areas sooner than we would like to get water because we were running out.

So this debate is back at it again. 

Here in Luperon, DR, its a no brainer.  The water in the harbor is too dirty to run a watermaker and good, clean water is readily available and cheap. Yesterday we took on 35 gallons of water that tested out at 24 PPM on our TDS meter.  That’s actually too clean and we might not be getting some minerals we need to be healthy.  Time to up our vitamin intake while we are drinking this water. This water cost us 50 DR pesos for each 5-gallon jug.  That’s about $1 per 5 gallons.  And that cost is delivered to our boat and poured into our tank. 

Supposedly we will have similar experiences in the rest of the Caribbean. 

Right now we think we might try to get a small 12-volt watermaker used.  Our friends on Wright Away just went through the process of evaluating their watermaker.  They have decided to ditch their 12-volt watermaker in favor of a 110-volt system.  So maybe we can buy their used 12-volt.  But read their write on their decision to get a bigger watermaker.  We have discussed this with them a lot and are still on the fence about what we are going to do.  It’s a great post and anyone considering adding a watermaker should read it.

Electricity

I won’t go into our decision to go with Renogy solar panels.  I have posted on that before and let’s just say we are disappointed in how Renogy is handling the quality issue.  But the panels we have are currently performing as expected when we installed them. Weather they stay on the boat or not is a different conversation.

As far as solar goes, we under-planned.  We left with 200 watts of solar.  Back in Hingham this would get us close to 100% state of charge by 2-3PM every day.  On the ICW we did so much motoring it didn’t really matter what the solar was doing.  However, once we were in the Bahamas we were chronically underchargine our batteries.  We found that we were using 25-50 amp hours per day more then we were getting from our solar. 

We think there are a couple of reasons for our undersized solar.  First is the fridge.  We had about a 30% run time on our fridge back in Hingham.  Now we seem to be more like 60% run time.  We believe the prime reason for this is the water temperature.  In Hingham harbor the water temp was typically around 68 degrees F.  In the Bahamas and south we are seeing temperatures around 82 degrees F.  Our fridge is located on the exterior of the hull and we think this is causing the fridge to run more. 

Other energy hogs that we didn’t plan correctly for were the laptop, iPad, and iPhones.  Many of these devices were charged on shore, typically at work, when were in Hingham.  And while we didn’t use the battery charger for most of our last 6 months in Mass because of the solar panels, we did have the shore power plugged in and on for charging stuff like the electronic devices. 

This resulted in us running our engine a lot to try and make up the difference in charge.  We were growing frustrated with this approach because it meant someone had to stay on the boat for several hours while it ran.  Sometimes this wasn’t too big of a deal and one of us would stay while the other ran some errands.  But we were using more diesel than we had planned.  We did end up buying a used Honda eu1000 generator off of our friends on Wright Away.  It can run our 40 amp charger and we have to run it for less time than we do the engine to top off the batteries. 

Based on what we have experienced we are a 100-watt panel short of covering our daily use.  On top of that we are considering adding a couple of power hungry devices to the boat (see watermaker and provisioning discussions above).  So we are planning to expand our solar system to 500-watts.  Finding places to put that many panels is tough on a small boat but doable if you think creatively. 

Dingy Management

I left with a dislike for davits.  I felt you couldn’t get them high enough to be safe in seas. They compromised the performance of the boat.  They were difficult to use compared to towing.  So we left with intent to manage the dingy by a combination of towing, storing the dingy on deck and using the Dinghy Sling.

Admittedly, I was wrong.

Towing works fine but can be inconvenient at times.  On the ICW, we would tow with the engine on.  Nothing could be easier.  It took little time to prep or to get in the dingy once anchored.  But when we start to head out into the sounds in the Bahamas or the Atlantic Ocean it took more prep.  Removing the engine and much of the other things stored in the dinghy could take considerable time.  We also had some situations where we would have the dinghy thrown at the stern in following seas.  Towing is doable but it does take more time and effort.  We now tow with two bridles when we head offshore.  It holds the boat behind us better and prevents some of the issues with following seas. 

Our deck is just too small to fit a dingy of any size comfortably.  If we had a little 6 or 7 foot dingy, maybe. But for us that is not a usable dingy.  We like our aluminum RIB Heighfields.  It tows well.  It can handle big seas for a dinghy.  And we are even starting to get up on plan when loaded down.  But putting it on deck involves deflating it and we still have limited access to the bow area with it up there.  This just isn’t an option on a 31 foot boat. 

The Dinghy Sling works great but has two draw backs.  Under the right wind conditions it can funnel the diesel exhaust into the cockpit.  We first experienced this during our gulf stream crossing and it made me get sick.  Second, its a little too complicated to use daily to get the dingy out of the water.  Getting the dingy out of the water for security is a major consideration the further south you go.  It’s a great product and cost effective easy solution for many boaters.  If we weren’t traveling with a dog, which requires us to be in the dinghy far more often than other cruisers, this may have stayed as our solution.

So we are now currently evaluating options to add dinghy davits to our boat.  This has taken a lot of planning and the cost will be considerable.  Most likely in the $2,500 neighborhood.  Of course some of that will be more expensive since we are doing the work in the islands instead of back in the states.

Anchoring System

In the 10 months we have been out, a little over a month combined of that time has been at a dock.  And this includes the 3 weeks we spent at Lady’s Island Marina in a free slip thanks to our friends Tom and Nancy.  We have been at anchor through gales, in rough conditions and in calm.  We have dragged anchor 3 times.  All due to short scope in calm conditions when we anchored in rivers with a deeper bottom and not enough swing room to put out even 5 to 1 scope.  But we knew the risk in these locations and took it anyways to enjoy an area that was otherwise inaccessible. 

We are and continue to be strong believers in new anchoring technology.  I will never consider having anything but a new generation anchor as my primary until science makes something better.  I am admittedly an anchor snob.  When I see a boat start to anchor near me using a bruce, plow, or CQR I get nervous and uptight.  I stare at them, give them angry glares and hope they will feel uncomfortable enough to move far away from Smitty.  In my opinion the science on this is solid and anyone using an old style anchor doesn’t below on the water.  The cost is so little that it should never justify sticking with the old anchors when it is the primary thing holding you safe at night.

We use a Manson Supreme 35 pounder as our primary.  This is oversized by two from what Manson recommends for our boat.  We love it.  We would also love a quality Rocna or Mantus.  I don’t think you could go wrong with any of these.   

We left to go cruising with only 20 feet of 5/16-inch chain.  We knew this wasn’t enough but were hoping we could find some more chain at a cheap price as we worked our way down the coast.  We picked up another 40 feet in Annapolis and then 90 feet from our friend Andrew on Solace (another Catalina 310 out cruising) in Miami.  We now have 130 feet of chain on our primary anchor.  Ideally I would want 150 feet of continuous chain on my primary (which is what Andrew did and why he had the 90 feet available).  But I will take what I have because I have not paid over $2 a foot for any of it.  Behind that I have 200 feet of 3 strand line. 

We have two Mantus chain hooks on board and love them.  We have the primary one setup on a bridle that I spliced.  We use this every night we anchor.  If heavy winds are predicted we will also put out the second Mantus hook on a chain snubber.  If the bridle were to let go, the snubber would take up before the chain would be pulling hard against the windless/cleat.

Our windless does not have a chain gypsy.  We wish it did, but at over $2K for a new windless it wasn’t in the budget.  So I raise the anchor by hand-hauling with the assistance of the rotating capstan that is our windless.  When I used to just hand-haul the anchor, the chain would smack agains the roller furler.  I didn’t like the damage this was doing and found that using the windless helps keep the chain below the roller furler.

We have several backup anchors too, including a 30-pound danforth, fortress anchor and 50-pound fisherman’s anchor.  If I would find a good deal on a larger fortress anchor or Mantus anchor I would replace the fisherman’s anchor with one of those. 

Navigation

We have been using an iPad as our primary chart plotter for 5 years now.  I wouldn’t change this at all.  The iPad is plenty accurate for a good skipper to use for navigating.  I would say I am no more than 20 feet off the location shown on the iPad.  In that type of space visual piloting is favored over any electronic form of navigation.

We use the Navionics app on the iPad for navigating.  For the most part I love this software.  The one exception is the Bahamas.  The map data was garbage there.  We started out supplementing Navionics with hard explorer charts.  But this involved a lot of putting in waypoints, something that the Navionics app is not strong on.  We ended up downloading the Garmin Bluecharts.  The map data for the Bahamas and Turks and Caicos was much better, but the app itself is lacking. For instance, there is no ETA function. 

So we will run both apps on the iPad.  We always have paper charts up in the cockpit with us too.  In addition, we keep a log of GPS coordinates, heading,  and speed every hour while offshore.  When we can see the coast we generally don’t keep the log. 

AIS

We looked into adding AIS but had a couple of reservations.  The units with remote mics were expensive and it would have required running wires up through the steering pedestal.  I tried to do this once before and found that our pedestal is maxed out with wires.  So this would have been a significant undertaking.  So we opted not to get AIS.

After traveling with several boats with AIS we wish we had it.  At night when we see a cruise ship or large cargo ship we have to try and estimate their location and try to hail them call for “the cruise ship at approximate GPS coordinates XXX”.  Most of the time they don’t answer.  But with AIS you have the name of the ship and they always answer when called by name.  It also helps keep tabs on buddy boats during night crossings.

In hindsight the smart thing would have been to add a second VHF with AIS and a second antenna mounted on the stern rail.  This would have given redundancy and made the installation much easier. 

Spares

This is a tough one because you never know what you might need and when.  We probably have too many spare impellers (12 on the boat) for our raw water pump.  But I didn’t have a rebuild kit and had to have Frank bring in two rebuild kits when he came for a visit.  They are short money ($45 each) and I should have had them on board.   We didn’t have a spare alternator and spent twice the cost of the alternator to have it shipped into the Bahamas when we thought we needed it. 

But we didn’t even think of things like spare 12-volt chargers for the laptop or cords for the iPad. Also, since we use the iPad as our primary chart plotter, I would really feel more comfortable with a spare iPad on board. 

You try to think about what you need for spares the best you can but the bottom line is you will always need something you don’t have.  Be prepared to improvise and have the knowledge to fix anything on your boat within reason.

Conclusion

This list of things we want to improve on our boat above represent a substantial cost.  This has made us ask each other many times if we are happy with this boat or if we should get a bigger boat.  The bottom line for us is this boat suites us well.  To get a boat that we like as much we would spend twice as much money on the boat and would probably still have to do all of the things we are thinking about doing to Smitty.  We like our pocket cruiser.  She is nimble, sea worthy, and comfortable for us.  Don’t expect to see Smitty on Yacht World anytime soon.

DSC_5085


7 Comments

Bahamas Chapter 10: Long Island

Long Island, Bahamas marks the last Chapter in our journey through the Bahamas.  We stopped at two different anchorages, and stayed a little over a week.  We rented a car with friends and checked out the island including:  Dean’s Blue Hole and some caves.  This island was devastated by Hurricane Joaquin (Category 4 hurricane that hit in October 2015) and is still recovering.  

Long Island1

Beach Bar for Cruisers

Long Island2

DSC_5080

DSC_5085

Long Island-001

Snorkeling Dean's Blue Hole

Long Island-002

Spelunking

Long Island-003

Lots of creepy, crawly things in the caves!

Long Island-004

Long Island

We absolutely loved the Bahamas and would like to eventually go back, but our current plan is to continue to head south.  Turks & Caicos here we come!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 144 other followers